Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Acta Trop. 2015 Oct;150:94-6. doi: 10.1016/j.actatropica.2015.07.001. Epub 2015 Jul 10.

Transmission of Enterobius vermicularis eggs through hands of school children in rural South Africa.

Author information

1
Environmental Health Group, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK. Electronic address: mollycranston@hotmail.co.uk.
2
Department of Microbiology, University of Venda, Thohoyandou, Limpopo Province, 0950, South Africa.
3
Environmental Health Group, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK.

Abstract

Enterobius vermicularis is a helminth that is difficult to control, is found globally, especially in crowded conditions, and can be transmitted from person to person by contaminated hands. A newly developed method for the quantification of helminth eggs on hands was tested among schoolchildren in a rural South African region to look at the role hands play in helminth infection, and to determine the risk factors for hand contamination. The study found 16.6% of participants' hands positive for helminth eggs, with E. vermicularis most commonly identified. Egg concentrations on hands ranged from 0 to 57 eggs/2 hands. Gender, toilet type used at home, and not reporting to wash hands with soap before eating were all associated with the presence of eggs on hands. The study highlights the need to improve sanitation facilities, and promote handwashing with soap in schools to prevent transmission of E. vermicularis.

KEYWORDS:

Enterobius vermicularis; Hands; Hygiene; South Africa

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center