Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cancer Causes Control. 2015 Oct;26(10):1393-403. doi: 10.1007/s10552-015-0630-4. Epub 2015 Jul 14.

The metabolic syndrome and mammographic breast density in a racially diverse and predominantly immigrant sample of women.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, 722 West 168th St, New York, NY, 10032, USA. pt140@columbia.edu.
2
Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. pt140@columbia.edu.
3
Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, 722 West 168th St, New York, NY, 10032, USA.
4
Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.
5
Division of Academics, Columbia University School of Nursing, New York, NY, USA.
6
Avon Foundation Breast Imaging Center-New York Presbyterian, New York, NY, USA.
7
Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.
8
Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The metabolic syndrome [MetS, clustering of elevated blood pressure, triglycerides and glucose, reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), abdominal obesity] has been associated with increased breast cancer risk, but less is known about its association with mammographic breast density, a strong risk factor for breast cancer.

METHODS:

We collected data on risk factors, body size, and blood pressure via in-person interviews and examinations and measured glucose, triglycerides, and HDL-C from dried blood spots from women recruited through a mammography screening clinic (n = 373; 68 % Hispanic, 17 % African-American, 63 % foreign born). We performed linear regression models to examine the associations of each MetS component and the MetS cluster (≥3 components) with percent density and dense breast area, measured using a computer-assisted technique and Cumulus software.

RESULTS:

About 45 % of women had the MetS, with the prevalence of the individual components ranging from 68 % for abdominal obesity to 33 % for elevated triglycerides. The prevalence of the MetS increased with higher body mass index (BMI) and postmenopausal status, but did not vary substantially by ethnicity, immigrant generational status, parity, age at menarche, or alcohol consumption. Low HDL-C (<50 mg/dL), but not the MetS cluster or the other MetS components, was associated with larger dense breast area after adjusting for age, BMI, fasting time, and educational attainment (β = 8.77, 95 % CI 2.39, 15.14). The MetS and its individual components were not associated with BMI-adjusted percent density.

CONCLUSIONS:

HDL-C alone may have an influence on dense breast tissue that is independent of BMI, and may be in the same direction as its association with breast cancer risk.

KEYWORDS:

Breast cancer; Glucose; HDL-cholesterol; Hispanic; Hypertension; Immigrants; Mammographic breast density; Metabolic syndrome; Triglycerides; Waist circumference

PMID:
26169301
PMCID:
PMC4567931
DOI:
10.1007/s10552-015-0630-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center