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Dev Cell. 2015 Jul 27;34(2):139-151. doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2015.05.013. Epub 2015 Jul 9.

Actin filament turnover drives leading edge growth during myelin sheath formation in the central nervous system.

Author information

1
Max Planck Institute for Experimental Medicine, 37075 Göttingen, Germany.
2
Department of Neurology, University of Göttingen, 37075 Göttingen, Germany.
3
III. Physics Institute, Faculty of Physics, University of Göttingen, 37077 Göttingen, Germany.
4
Center for Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain (CNMPB), Göttingen, Germany.
5
Institute for Physical Chemistry, University of Göttingen, 37075 Göttingen, Germany.
6
Centre for Neuroregeneration, Chancellor's Building, GU 507B, 49 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SB, UK.
7
Institute of Genetics, University of Bonn, Karlrobert-Kreiten Strasse 13, 53115 Bonn, Germany.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

During CNS development, oligodendrocytes wrap their plasma membrane around axons to generate multilamellar myelin sheaths. To drive growth at the leading edge of myelin at the interface with the axon, mechanical forces are necessary, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. Using an interdisciplinary approach that combines morphological, genetic, and biophysical analyses, we identified a key role for actin filament network turnover in myelin growth. At the onset of myelin biogenesis, F-actin is redistributed to the leading edge, where its polymerization-based forces push out non-adhesive and motile protrusions. F-actin disassembly converts protrusions into sheets by reducing surface tension and in turn inducing membrane spreading and adhesion. We identified the actin depolymerizing factor ADF/cofilin1, which mediates high F-actin turnover rates, as an essential factor in this process. We propose that F-actin turnover is the driving force in myelin wrapping by regulating repetitive cycles of leading edge protrusion and spreading.

PMID:
26166299
PMCID:
PMC4736019
DOI:
10.1016/j.devcel.2015.05.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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