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Psychiatry Res. 2015 Aug 30;228(3):475-81. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2015.05.060. Epub 2015 Jun 25.

Stability of executive functions in first episode psychosis: One year follow up study.

Author information

1
NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Kirkeveien 166, 0407 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: b.c.haatveit@medisin.uio.no.
2
NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Kirkeveien 166, 0407 Oslo, Norway; Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1094 Blindern, 0317 Oslo, Norway.
3
NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Kirkeveien 166, 0407 Oslo, Norway; Centre for Psychology, Kristianstad University, Elmetorpsvägen 15, 291 39 Kristianstad, Sweden.
4
NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Kirkeveien 166, 0407 Oslo, Norway.

Abstract

Executive functioning is a multi-dimensional construct covering several sub-processes. The aim of this study was to determine whether executive functions, indexed by a broad range of executive measures remain stable in first episode psychosis (FEP) over time. Eighty-two patients and 107 age and gender matched healthy controls were assessed on five subdomains of executive functioning; working memory, fluency, flexibility, and inhibitory control at baseline and at 1 year follow-up. Results showed that patients performed significantly poorer than controls on all executive measures at both assessment points. In general executive functions remained stable from baseline to follow-up, although both groups improved on measures of inhibitory control and flexibility. In phonemic fluency, controls showed a slight improvement while patients showed a slight decline. Investigation of individual trajectories revealed some fluctuations in both groups over time, but mainly supports the group level findings. The implications of these results are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Cognition; Longitudinal study; Reliable change; Schizophrenia spectrum disorders

PMID:
26165960
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2015.05.060
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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