Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2015 Oct;96(10):1913-1923.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2015.04.026. Epub 2015 Jul 9.

Custom-Made Finger Orthoses Have Fewer Skin Complications Than Prefabricated Finger Orthoses in the Management of Mallet Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Author information

1
Northern Health, Epping, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address: ejcomini@gmail.com.
2
Northern Health, Epping, Victoria, Australia; La Trobe University and Northern Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate which orthosis results in (1) fewer complications; (2) the least extensor lag; and (3) the highest rates of treatment success according to the Abouna and Brown criteria for soft tissue mallet injury in adults.

DATA SOURCES:

Electronic databases AMED, CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE, PubMed, OTseeker, and PEDro were searched from the earliest available date until September 16, 2014.

STUDY SELECTION:

Controlled trials evaluating orthosis type in the conservative management of mallet injury were included. Database searching yielded 1024 potential studies, of which 7 met inclusion criteria with a total of 491 participants.

DATA EXTRACTION:

Data were extracted using an author-designed extraction form by one reviewer, and accuracy was assessed by a second reviewer. The PEDro scale was used to assess methodological quality.

DATA SYNTHESIS:

Results were pooled using a random-effects model with inverse variance methods. Dichotomous outcomes are expressed as risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and continuous outcomes as standardized mean differences and 95% CIs. There is moderate quality evidence that prefabricated orthoses had 3 times the risk of developing skin complications as compared with all other orthoses (RR, 3.17; 95% CI, 1.19-8.43; I(2)=47%) and nearly 7 times the risk of developing skin complications as compared with custom-made thermoplastic orthoses (RR, 6.72; 95% CI, 1.59-28.46; I(2)=0%). Treatment outcomes were found to be similar for treatment success when prefabricated orthoses were compared with custom-made orthoses (RR, .99; 95% CI, 0.80-1.22; I(2)=39%; very low quality evidence), as well as for extensor lag when custom-made thermoplastic orthoses were compared with other orthoses (standardized mean difference, .03; 95% CI, -.29 to .36; I(2)=0%; moderate quality evidence).

CONCLUSIONS:

Prefabricated orthoses were found to increase the risk of developing skin complications as compared with custom-made orthoses, but there were no differences in treatment success, failure, or extensor lag.

KEYWORDS:

Finger injuries; Orthotic devices; Rehabilitation; Splints; Tendon injuries

PMID:
26163944
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2015.04.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center