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Environ Pollut. 2015 Nov;206:142-9. doi: 10.1016/j.envpol.2015.06.025. Epub 2015 Jul 8.

Occurrence of organochlorine pesticides in the environmental matrices from King George Island, west Antarctica.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China; Institute of Environment and Health, Jianghan University, Wuhan 430056, China. Electronic address: qhzhang@rcees.ac.cn.
2
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China.
3
Institute of Environment and Health, Jianghan University, Wuhan 430056, China; School of Medicine, Jianghan University, Wuhan 430056, China.

Abstract

Antarctica is considered as a final sink of many persistent organic pollutants (POPs). This work aims to investigate the levels, distributions and potential sources of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) with HRGC/HRMS technique. Twenty-three OCPs were measured in various environmental matrices from King George Island, west Antarctica. The total concentrations (Σ23OCPs) were at quite low levels, ranging 93.6-1260 pg g(-1) dry weight (dw) in soil and sediment, 223-1053 pg g(-1) dw in moss and 373-812 pg g(-1) dw in lichen. Hexachlorobenzene (HCB), dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites (especially p,p'-DDE) and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) were the main contaminants in all samples. Lower α-HCH/γ-HCH and higher p,p'-DDE/p,p'-DDT ratios compared with the technical products indicated long-range atmospheric transport (LRAT) of recent lindane and aged technical DDT. Significant dependence of many OCPs concentrations on total organic carbon (TOC) was observed. Apart from LRAT, local biotic activities could also contribute and influence the spatial distribution of the contaminants.

KEYWORDS:

Antarctica; HRGC/HRMS; Organochlorine pesticides; Soil; Vegetation

PMID:
26162333
DOI:
10.1016/j.envpol.2015.06.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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