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Br J Psychiatry. 2015 Sep;207(3):221-6. doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.114.156786. Epub 2015 Jul 9.

Antidepressant use in 27 European countries: associations with sociodemographic, cultural and economic factors.

Author information

1
Dan Lewer, BSc, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, UK; Claire O'Reilly, PhD, Faculty of Pharmacy, The University of Sydney, Australia; Ramin Mojtabai, MD, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, USA; Sara Evans-Lacko, PhD, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, and Personal Social Services Research Unit, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.
2
Dan Lewer, BSc, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, UK; Claire O'Reilly, PhD, Faculty of Pharmacy, The University of Sydney, Australia; Ramin Mojtabai, MD, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, USA; Sara Evans-Lacko, PhD, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, and Personal Social Services Research Unit, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK sara.evans-lacko@kcl.ac.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Prescribing of antidepressants varies widely between European countries despite no evidence of difference in the prevalence of affective disorders.

AIMS:

To investigate associations between the use of antidepressants, country-level spending on healthcare and country-level attitudes towards mental health problems.

METHOD:

We used Eurobarometer 2010, a large general population survey from 27 European countries, to measure antidepressant use and regularity of use. We then analysed the associations with country-level spending on healthcare and country-level attitudes towards mental health problems.

RESULTS:

Higher country spending on healthcare was strongly associated with regular use of antidepressants. Beliefs that mentally ill people are 'dangerous' were associated with higher use, and beliefs that they 'never recover' or 'have themselves to blame' were associated with lower and less regular use of antidepressants.

CONCLUSIONS:

Contextual factors, such as healthcare spending and public attitudes towards mental illness, may partly explain variations in antidepressant use and regular use of these medications.

PMID:
26159603
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.114.156786
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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