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Lancet. 2015 Oct 31;386(10005):1776-85. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(15)60252-5. Epub 2015 Jul 6.

Controversies in faith and health care.

Author information

1
Institute for Global Health, Institute of Child Health, UCL, London, UK. Electronic address: a.tomkins@ucl.ac.uk.
2
Partnership for Faith and Development, USA.
3
Islamic Relief Worldwide, Birmingham, UK.
4
UNFPA, New York, NY, USA.
5
University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
6
Buddhist Healthcare Chaplaincy Group, London, UK.
7
UNAIDS, Geneva, Switzerland.
8
Azim Premji University, Bangalore, India.
9
Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel.
10
Caritas Internationalis, Geneva, Switzerland.
11
Daystar University, Nairobi Kenya.

Erratum in

Abstract

Differences in religious faith-based viewpoints (controversies) on the sanctity of human life, acceptable behaviour, health-care technologies and health-care services contribute to the widespread variations in health care worldwide. Faith-linked controversies include family planning, child protection (especially child marriage, female genital mutilation, and immunisation), stigma and harm reduction, violence against women, sexual and reproductive health and HIV, gender, end-of-life issues, and faith activities including prayer. Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and traditional beliefs have similarities and differences in their viewpoints. Improved understanding by health-care providers of the heterogeneity of viewpoints, both within and between faiths, and their effect on health care is important for clinical medicine, public-health programmes, and health-care policy. Increased appreciation in faith leaders of the effect of their teachings on health care is also crucial. This Series paper outlines some faith-related controversies, describes how they influence health-care provision and uptake, and identifies opportunities for research and increased interaction between faith leaders and health-care providers to improve health care.

PMID:
26159392
DOI:
10.1016/S0140-6736(15)60252-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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