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Pharm Biol. 2016;54(4):576-80. doi: 10.3109/13880209.2015.1064450. Epub 2015 Jul 8.

Analgesic activity of Gleditsia triacanthos methanolic fruit extract and its saponin-containing fraction.

Author information

1
a Department of Pharmacology and.
2
b Department of Chemistry of Natural Compounds , National Research Centre , Dokki , Giza , Egypt.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Gleditsia triacanthos L. (Leguminosae) pods are used in folk medicine for pain relief as anodyne and narcotic.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study is to evaluate analgesic activity of Gleditsia triacanthos methanolic fruit extract (MEGT) and its saponin-containing fraction (SFGT).

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Peripheral analgesic activity was assessed using the acetic acid-induced writhing model in mice at doses of 140, 280, and 560 mg/kg and formalin test in rats at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg doses. Central analgesic activity was evaluated using the hotplate method in rats (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg).

RESULTS:

In the writhing test, six mice groups treated with MEGT and SFGT found ED50 values 268.2 and 161.2 mg/kg, respectively, displayed a significant decrease in writhing count compared with the group treated with standard drug indomethacin (14 mg/kg). SFGT (280 and 560 mg/kg) showed 64.94 and 70.78% protection, respectively, which are more than double % protection caused by indomethacin (31.82%). In the formalin test, MEGT and SFGT (ED50 values 287.6 and 283.4 mg/kg for phase I as well as 295.1 and 290.4 mg/kg for phase II, respectively) at 400 mg/kg showed significant % inhibition in both phase I (18.86 and 52.57%) and phase II (39.36 and 44.29%) with reference to 10 mg/kg indomethacin (56.0 and 32.29%). MEGT and SFGT caused significant delay in responses in hotplate model (ED50 values 155.4 and 200.6 mg/kg, respectively) compared with that of 10 mg/kg indomethacin at 30, 60, and 120 min.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION:

Central and peripheral analgesic activities induced by Gleditsia triacanthos fruits might account for its uses in folk medicine.

KEYWORDS:

Antinociceptive activity; pain; saponins

PMID:
26154522
DOI:
10.3109/13880209.2015.1064450
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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