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J Sch Health. 1989 Dec;59(10):427-31.

Teacher perspectives after implementing a human sexuality education program.

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1
Dept. of Health and Human Performance, University of Houston, TX 77204-5331.

Abstract

To help teachers enhance the effectiveness of their classroom instruction in human sexuality education, it is necessary to understand their attitudes and concerns about their teaching experiences. Forty-seven sixth grade teachers were surveyed one year after curriculum implementation to examine perceptions of themselves, their students, colleagues, and community. Teachers answered 70% of the knowledge items correctly and indicated slightly liberal orientations. Overall levels of teachers' views generally were positive on scales designed to measure: importance of the items studied, responsibility for student outcomes, three measures of comfort, adequacy of preparation, required changes, ease of use, social supports, and student responses. However, patterns of teacher responses within scales indicated numerous concerns related to curriculum implementation. The concerns and teacher-identified benefits and barriers to teaching the course indicate a focus for continuing education.

PIP:

To help teachers enhance the effectiveness of their classroom instruction in human sexuality education, it is necessary to understand their attitudes and concerns about their teaching experiences. 47 6th grade teachers were surveyed 1 year after curriculum implementation to examine perceptions of themselves, their students, colleagues, and community, in a large urban school district in southwestern US. The teachers previously had completed 1 week of inservice training during summer 1987 and had volunteered to participate in the project. Teachers answered 70% of the knowledge items correctly and indicated slightly liberal orientations. Overall levels of teachers' views generally were positive on scales designed to measure: importance of the items studies, responsibility for student outcomes, 3 measures of comfort, adequacy of preparation, required changes, ease of use, social supports, and student responses. However, patterns of teacher responses within scales indicated numerous concerns related to curriculum implementation. While teachers placed high value across the importance, responsibility, and comfort scales, on self-esteem, interactional skills, and STDs, diminished importance was placed on birth control and student sexual behavior. Similarly, identification and use of resource materials was indicated as the area in which teachers felt least adequately prepared and felt the most change from previous teaching techniques. Access to resources also was a major cause of dissatisfaction with administrative support. However, the strong support teachers perceived from administrators at the school and district levels, their positive perceptions of student responses, and the higher-order teacher concerns for the impact of the curriculum on students are encouraging and bode well for maintenance of the curriculum. Many of the teacher attitudes identified are associated with desire to continue teaching the human sexuality education course. The concerns and teacher-identified benefits and barriers to teaching the course indicate a focus for continuing education.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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