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J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2016 Jan;155(Pt B):239-44. doi: 10.1016/j.jsbmb.2015.06.013. Epub 2015 Jul 4.

Incidence rate of type 2 diabetes is >50% lower in GrassrootsHealth cohort with median serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D of 41 ng/ml than in NHANES cohort with median of 22 ng/ml.

Author information

1
GrassrootsHealth, Encinitas, CA, USA. Electronic address: sharon@grassrootshealth.org.
2
GrassrootsHealth, Encinitas, CA, USA.
3
Creighton University, Omaha, NE, USA.
4
Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
5
Department of Medicine, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.
6
School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Abstract

Higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations have been associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes. This study compared incidence rates of type 2 diabetes among participants aged ≥20 years in two U.S. cohorts with markedly different median 25(OH)D concentrations. The median 25(OH)D concentration in the GrassrootsHealth (GRH) cohort was 41 ng/ml (N=4933) while in the 2005-6 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) it was 22 ng/ml (N=4078) (P<0.0001). The adjusted annual incidence rate of type 2 diabetes was 3.7 per 1000 population (95% confidence interval=1.9, 6.6) in the GRH cohort, compared to 9.3 per 1000 population (95% confidence interval=6.7, 12.6) in NHANES. In the NHANES cohort, the lowest 25(OH)D tertiles (<17, 17-24 ng/ml) had higher odds of developing diabetes than the highest tertile (OR: 4.9, P=0.02 and 4.8, P=0.01 respectively), adjusting for covariates. Differences in demographics and methods may have limited comparability. Raising serum 25(OH)D may be a useful tool for reducing risk of diabetes in the population.

KEYWORDS:

Serum 25–hydroxyvitamin D; Type 2 diabetes; Vitamin D

PMID:
26151742
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsbmb.2015.06.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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