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Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2015 Sep;136:7-12. doi: 10.1016/j.pbb.2015.06.012. Epub 2015 Jul 4.

Effects of amycenone on serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-10, and depression-like behavior in mice after lipopolysaccharide administration.

Author information

1
Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Chiba, Japan.
2
Mushroom Wisdom Ltd., NJ, USA.
3
Hirota Clinic, Kurume, Fukuoka, Japan.
4
Chikusuikai Institute for Neuroinformation, Chikusuikai Hospital, Yame, Fukuoka, Japan.
5
Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Chiba, Japan. Electronic address: hashimoto@faculty.chiba-u.jp.

Abstract

Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammation plays a role in the pathophysiology of depression and that anti-inflammatory substances have antidepressant effects. Amycenone is obtained from extracts of the Yamabushitake (Hericium erinaceum). The purpose of this study is to examine whether amycenone shows anti-inflammatory and antidepressant effects in an inflammation-induced mouse model of depression. First, we examined the effects of amycenone on the serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 (IL-10), after intraperitoneal administration of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Oral administration of amycenone (50, 100, or 200mg/kg) markedly blocked an increase in the serum TNF-α levels after a single administration of LPS (0.5mg/kg). Furthermore, amycenone (200mg/kg) markedly increased the serum IL-10 levels by a single administration of LPS (0.5mg/kg). Next, we examined the effects of amycenone on depression-like behaviors in the tail-suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST). Pretreatment with amycenone (200mg/kg) significantly attenuated LPS (0.5mg/kg)-induced increase of the immobility time by the TST and FST, indicating antidepressant effects of amycenone. In addition, oral administration of paroxetine (30mg/kg) showed anti-inflammatory and antidepressant effects in the same model. These findings suggest that amycenone has antidepressant effects in LPS-induced inflammation model of depression. Therefore, amycenone could represent a potential supplement to prevent inflammation-related depression.

KEYWORDS:

Amycenone; Anti-inflammatory activity; Cytokine; Depression; Hericium erinaceum

PMID:
26150007
DOI:
10.1016/j.pbb.2015.06.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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