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Heart Lung Circ. 2015 Nov;24(11):1053-61. doi: 10.1016/j.hlc.2015.05.013. Epub 2015 Jun 23.

A Review of Carbon Dioxide Monitoring During Adult Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

Author information

1
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, "Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation", Athens, Greece. Electronic address: chpantazo@yahoo.gr.
2
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, "Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation", Athens, Greece.
3
ELPEN Research -Experimental Centre, Athens, Greece.
4
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, Aretaieio Hospital, Department of Biopathology, Athens, Greece.
5
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, Aretaieio Hospital, Neonatology Department, Athens, Greece.

Abstract

Although high quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation is one of the most significant factors related to favourable outcome, its quality depends on many components, such as airway management, compression depth and chest recoil, hands-off time, and early defibrillation. The most common way of controlling the resuscitation efforts is monitoring of end-tidal carbon dioxide. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation suggests this method both for in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, despite the abundant human and animal studies supporting the usefulness of end-tidal carbon dioxide, its optimal values during cardiopulmonary resuscitation remain controversial. In this review, the advantages and effectiveness of end-tidal carbon dioxide during cardiopulmonary resuscitation are discussed and specific target values are suggested based on the available literature.

KEYWORDS:

Adults.; Capnography; Capnometry; End-tidal carbon dioxide; Monitoring; Resuscitation

PMID:
26150002
DOI:
10.1016/j.hlc.2015.05.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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