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Bol Asoc Med P R. 2014;106(4):6-10.

CERVICAL CYTOLOGY TRENDS IN A SAMPLE OF INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE PATIENTS IN PUERTO RICO: A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY AND RESEARCH OF CURRENT LITERATURE.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY:

To describe cervical cytology trends in a sample of patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and to provide an overview of aspects such as contraception and menstrual patterns.

STUDY DESIGN:

We identified women with diagnosis of IBD of ages between 21-49 years followed at the IBD clinics of the Medical Sciences Campus from June 2012 to April 2014. A 15-minute questionnaire was administered. Data was entered and analyzed calculating frequencies and percentages.

RESULTS:

Sixty-three subjects were recruited. After reviewing the questionnaires, 52 subjects remained for analysis. All women were between 21 and 49 years of age. Thirty (58%) patients had a diagnosis of ulcerative colitis (UC), while 22 (42%) patients had Crohn's Disease (CD). Twenty-seven IBD patients (52%) were in remission. Use of immunomodulators was reported in ten (33%) and seventeen (61%) of patients for UC and CD respectively. Sixty six percent (67%) of participants specified having their cervical cytology for cervical cancer screening done a nually. Twenty patients (38%) reported abnormal cytology including 13 patients (43%) with UC and 7 patients (23%) with CD. No significant relation was found between the two conditions and the self-reported history of abnormal cervical cytology. Almost one-half of IBD patients reported a menstrual cycle of 25-30 days (45%). Duration of menses was described as normal (lasting between 4-6 days) in 45% of IBD patients (95% CI 31.13-59.66). Patients with UC were more likely to report regular menses than patients with CD. Eighty-six percent of participants reported no use of contraception.

CONCLUSION:

This is the first descriptive report of gynecologic conditions in which Puerto Rican patients with IBD have been studied. It is imperative to continue with similar larger studies to gain a broader idea of what are the gynecological needs of this population.

PMID:
26148391
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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