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Nat Med. 2015 Aug;21(8):863-5. doi: 10.1038/nm.3891. Epub 2015 Jul 6.

Short-term cold acclimation improves insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Author information

1
Department of Human Biology, School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
2
Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
3
Department of Human Movement Sciences, School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
4
Nutrition, Metabolism and Genomics group, Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
6
1] Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) Aachen, Aachen, Germany.

Abstract

Cold exposure may be a potential therapy for diabetes by increasing brown adipose tissue (BAT) mass and activity. Here we report that 10 d of cold acclimation (14-15 °C) increased peripheral insulin sensitivity by ∼43% in eight type 2 diabetes subjects. Basal skeletal muscle GLUT4 translocation markedly increased, without effects on insulin signaling or AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and only a minor increase in BAT glucose uptake.

PMID:
26147760
DOI:
10.1038/nm.3891
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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