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Nat Immunol. 2015 Aug;16(8):880-8. doi: 10.1038/ni.3213. Epub 2015 Jun 29.

Diversification of memory B cells drives the continuous adaptation of secretory antibodies to gut microbiota.

Author information

1
Institute of Immunology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.
2
Laboratory for Animal Science, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.
3
Department for Internal Medicine I, University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Kiel, Germany.
4
Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.
5
Institute of Medical Microbiology and Hospital Epidemiology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.
6
1] Department for Internal Medicine I, University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Kiel, Germany. [2] Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany.
7
INSERM UMR1163, Laboratory of Intestinal Immunity, Institut Imagine, Paris, France.
8
The Mina &Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel.
9
Department of Food Safety and Infection Biology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Biosciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
10
Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany.
11
1] Institute of Immunology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. [2] Institute of Molecular Medicine, RWTH Aachen, Aachen, Germany.

Abstract

Secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) shields the gut epithelium from luminal antigens and contributes to host-microbe symbiosis. However, how antibody responses are regulated to achieve sustained host-microbe interactions is unknown. We found that mice and humans exhibited longitudinal persistence of clonally related B cells in the IgA repertoire despite major changes in the microbiota during antibiotic treatment or infection. Memory B cells recirculated between inductive compartments and were clonally related to plasma cells in gut and mammary glands. Our findings suggest that continuous diversification of memory B cells constitutes a central process for establishing symbiotic host-microbe interactions and offer an explanation of how maternal antibodies are optimized throughout life to protect the newborn.

PMID:
26147688
DOI:
10.1038/ni.3213
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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