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PLoS One. 2015 Jul 6;10(7):e0132034. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0132034. eCollection 2015.

Multiple Genetic Modifiers of Bilirubin Metabolism Involvement in Significant Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia in Patients of Chinese Descent.

Author information

1
Laboratory Medical Center, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, P. R. China; Central Laboratory, Chaozhou Central Hospital Affiliated to Southern Medical University, Chaozhou, Guangdong Province, P. R. China.
2
Laboratory Medical Center, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, P. R. China.
3
Central Laboratory, Chaozhou Central Hospital Affiliated to Southern Medical University, Chaozhou, Guangdong Province, P. R. China.

Abstract

The potential for genetic variation to modulate neonatal hyperbilirubinemia risk is increasingly being recognized. A case-control study was designed to assess comprehensive contributions of the multiple genetic modifiers of bilirubin metabolism on significant neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in Chinese descendents. Eleven common mutations and polymorphisms across five bilirubin metabolism genes, namely those encoding UGT1A1, HMOX1, BLVRA, SLCO1B1 and SLCO1B3, were determined using the high resolution melt (HRM) assay or PCR-capillary electrophoresis analysis. A total of 129 hyperbilirubinemic infants and 108 control subjects were evaluated. Breastfeeding and the presence of the minor A allele of rs4148323 (UGTA*6) were correlated with an increased risk of hyperbilirubinemia (OR=2.17, P=0.02 for breastfeeding; OR=9.776, P=0.000 for UGTA*6 homozygote; OR=3.151, P=0.000 for UGTA*6 heterozygote); whereas, increasing gestational age and the presence of -TA7 repeat variant of UGT1A1 decreased the risk (OR=0.721, P=0.003 for gestational age; OR=0.313, P=0.002 for heterozygote TA6/TA7). In addition, the SLCO1B1 and SLCO1B3 polymorphisms also contributed to an increased risk of hyperbilirubinemia. This detailed analysis revealed the impact of multiple genetic modifiers on neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. This may support the use of genetic tests for clinical risk assessment. Furthermore, the established HRM assay can serve as an effective method for large-scale investigation.

PMID:
26146841
PMCID:
PMC4493094
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0132034
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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