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J Nutr Educ Behav. 2015 Sep-Oct;47(5):452-8.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jneb.2015.05.008. Epub 2015 Jul 2.

Demographic, Physiologic, and Psychosocial Correlates of Physical Activity in Structured Exercise and Sports Among Low-Income, Overweight Children.

Author information

1
Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA; ChildObesity180, Tufts University, Boston, MA. Electronic address: daniel.hatfield@tufts.edu.
2
Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA; Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Tufts University, Boston, MA.
3
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Tufts University, Boston, MA.
4
Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA.
5
Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA; ChildObesity180, Tufts University, Boston, MA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe correlates of physical activity (PA) in structured exercise and structured sports sessions among low-income, overweight children participating in a community-based PA program.

METHODS:

A total of 93 children (55% male; 91% Hispanic) aged 8-14 years were included. Participants wore pedometers in a sample of 10 of 59 total sessions offered; mean steps per minute were calculated for structured exercise and sports sessions. Separate multivariable regression models tested associations between steps per minute in exercise and sports sessions and 5 potential correlates: baseline body mass index z-score, aerobic fitness (Progressive Aerobic Cardiorespiratory Endurance Run laps), perceived athletic competence (Harter self-perception profile), sex, and age.

RESULTS:

Only age (ß = -2.9; P = .02) significantly predicted steps per minute in exercise sessions. Age (ß = -4.3; P = .007), fitness (ß = 0.45; P = .03), and male sex (ß = 8.7; P = .02) significantly predicted steps per minute in sports.

CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS:

In structured exercise and sports, perceived competence may not influence overweight and obese children's PA. However, girls and older or less fit children may engage less actively, especially in sports.

KEYWORDS:

children; obesity; physical activity; physical fitness; psychosocial factors

PMID:
26145759
DOI:
10.1016/j.jneb.2015.05.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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