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Acad Pediatr. 2015 Jul-Aug;15(4):367-73. doi: 10.1016/j.acap.2015.01.001.

Resident Self-Assessment and Learning Goal Development: Evaluation of Resident-Reported Competence and Future Goals.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of California Davis, School of Medicine, Sacramento, Calif. Electronic address: su-ting.li@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu.
2
Departments of Internal Medicine and Sociology, University of California Davis, School of Medicine, Sacramento, Calif; Center for Healthcare Policy and Research, University of California Davis, School of Medicine, Sacramento, Calif.
3
Department of Pediatrics, University of California Davis, School of Medicine, Sacramento, Calif; Center for Healthcare Policy and Research, University of California Davis, School of Medicine, Sacramento, Calif.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine, Dayton, Ohio.
5
Department of Pediatrics, University of South Alabama College of Medicine, Mobile, Ala.
6
Department of Pediatrics, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, Vt.
7
Office of Academic Affairs, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY.
8
Department of Pediatrics, Nationwide Children's Hospital/Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine incidence of learning goals by competency area and to assess which goals fall into competency areas with lower self-assessment scores.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional analysis of existing deidentified American Academy of Pediatrics' PediaLink individualized learning plan data for the academic year 2009-2010. Residents self-assessed competencies in the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competency areas and wrote learning goals. Textual responses for goals were mapped to 6 ACGME competency areas, future practice, or personal attributes. Adjusted mean differences and associations were estimated using multiple linear and logistic regression.

RESULTS:

A total of 2254 residents reported 6078 goals. Residents self-assessed their systems-based practice (51.8) and medical knowledge (53.0) competencies lowest and professionalism (68.9) and interpersonal and communication skills (62.2) highest. Residents were most likely to identify goals involving medical knowledge (70.5%) and patient care (50.5%) and least likely to write goals on systems-based practice (11.0%) and professionalism (6.9%). In logistic regression analysis adjusting for postgraduate year (PGY), gender, and degree type (MD/DO), resident-reported goal area showed no association with the learner's relative self-assessment score for that competency area. In the conditional logistic regression analysis, with each learner serving as his or her own control, senior residents (PGY2/3+s) who rated themselves relatively lower in a competency area were more likely to write a learning goal in that area than were PGY1s.

CONCLUSIONS:

Senior residents appear to develop better skills and/or motivation to explicitly turn self-assessed learning gaps into learning goals, suggesting that individualized learning plans may help improve self-regulated learning during residency.

KEYWORDS:

learning goal; medical education; resident; self-assessment

PMID:
26142068
DOI:
10.1016/j.acap.2015.01.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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