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Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2015 Sep;48(3):e45-50. doi: 10.1093/ejcts/ezv235. Epub 2015 Jul 3.

Outcomes after aortic arch reconstruction for infants: deep hypothermic circulatory arrest versus moderate hypothermia with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, Novosibirsk State Research Institute of Circulation Pathology, Novosibirsk, Russia i_kornilov@nricp.ru.
2
Department of Congenital Heart Disease, Federal Center of Cardiac Surgery, Perm, Russia.
3
Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Novosibirsk State Research Institute of Circulation Pathology, Novosibirsk, Russia.
4
Department of Anesthesiology, Novosibirsk State Research Institute of Circulation Pathology, Novosibirsk, Russia.
5
Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Novosibirsk State Research Institute of Circulation Pathology, Novosibirsk, Russia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Optimal cerebral and visceral protection is crucial in aortic arch surgery. The main method for this protection has traditionally been deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA). Recently, antegrade cerebral perfusion with moderate hypothermia has become the preferred strategy for adult patients and some children undergoing aortic arch surgery. Continuous cerebral perfusion should reduce the incidence of neurological complications, but the degree of damage to organs and systems resulting from the lack of blood flow distal to the aortic arch remains unclear. Here, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of methods of protecting the brain and internal organs during aortic arch surgery in infants.

METHODS:

We performed a retrospective review of 62 patients who underwent aortic arch reconstruction to assess their neurological status and internal injuries after different methods of cerebral protection.

RESULTS:

Surgical correction of aortic arch congenital abnormalities was performed under DHCA in 27 patients (Group I), and unilateral selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP) was performed in 35 patients (Group II). In Group I, 30.8% of patients had neurological complications, whereas in Group II 5.9% had neurological complications. The odds ratio for a neurological event was significantly lower in Group II compared with Group I-0.14 [(95% CI 0.02-0.63), P = 0.02]. However, incidence of renal dysfunction was significantly higher in the second group than the first: 21 (61.2%) vs 5 (19.2%) cases, respectively [odds ratio 6.49 (95% CI 1.41-38.26), P = 0.02].

CONCLUSIONS:

Aortic arch reconstruction accompanied by SACP has a lower risk of neurological complications compared with DHCA. However, the high incidence of renal complications with SACP requires further study.

KEYWORDS:

Antegrade cerebral perfusion; Aortic arch surgery; Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest; Infants; Renal dysfunction

PMID:
26141543
DOI:
10.1093/ejcts/ezv235
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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