Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Circ Res. 2015 Jul 3;117(2):207-19. doi: 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.117.305205.

Exercise and the cardiovascular system: clinical science and cardiovascular outcomes.

Author information

1
From the Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Clinical School-University of Queensland School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (C.J.L., R.V.M.); Department of Physical Therapy and Integrative Physiology Laboratory, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago (R.A.); Department of Kinesiology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (D.L.S.); Department of Preventive Medicine, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA (N.M.J., T.S.C.); School of Kinesiology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge (N.M.J.); Department of Exercise Science, Arnold School of Public Health University of South Carolina, Columbia (X.S., S.N.B.); Department of Kinesiology, College of Human Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames (D.c.L.); Department of Health and Kinesiology, Texas A&M University, College Station (C.P.E.); and Department of Cardiovascular Disease, Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, University of Missouri-Kansas City (J.H.O.). clavie@ochsner.org.
2
From the Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Clinical School-University of Queensland School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (C.J.L., R.V.M.); Department of Physical Therapy and Integrative Physiology Laboratory, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago (R.A.); Department of Kinesiology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (D.L.S.); Department of Preventive Medicine, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA (N.M.J., T.S.C.); School of Kinesiology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge (N.M.J.); Department of Exercise Science, Arnold School of Public Health University of South Carolina, Columbia (X.S., S.N.B.); Department of Kinesiology, College of Human Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames (D.c.L.); Department of Health and Kinesiology, Texas A&M University, College Station (C.P.E.); and Department of Cardiovascular Disease, Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, University of Missouri-Kansas City (J.H.O.).

Abstract

Substantial evidence has established the value of high levels of physical activity, exercise training (ET), and overall cardiorespiratory fitness in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. This article reviews some basics of exercise physiology and the acute and chronic responses of ET, as well as the effect of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness on cardiovascular diseases. This review also surveys data from epidemiological and ET studies in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, particularly coronary heart disease and heart failure. These data strongly support the routine prescription of ET to all patients and referrals for patients with cardiovascular diseases, especially coronary heart disease and heart failure, to specific cardiac rehabilitation and ET programs.

KEYWORDS:

body mass index; cardiovascular diseases; exercise; heart failure; metabolic equivalent

PMID:
26139859
PMCID:
PMC4493772
DOI:
10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.117.305205
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center