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Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2016 Jan;293(1):143-155. doi: 10.1007/s00404-015-3811-1. Epub 2015 Jul 3.

Green tea, black tea consumption and risk of endometrial cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Science and Education, First People's Hospital of Changde City, No. 818, Renming road, Changde, 415003, Hunan, China.
2
Department of Oncology, First People's Hospital of Changde City, No. 818, Renming road, Changde, 415003, Hunan, China.
3
Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical University, Zunyi Medical University, No. 149, Dalian road, Zunyi, 563000, Guizhou, China.
4
Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, No. 79, Chongshan road, Shenyang, 110032, Liaoning, China.
5
Department of Oncology, First People's Hospital of Changde City, No. 818, Renming road, Changde, 415003, Hunan, China. cdyymike@163.com.
6
Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical University, Zunyi Medical University, No. 149, Dalian road, Zunyi, 563000, Guizhou, China. mahuab@163.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Several studies have assessed the association between green and black tea consumption and the risk of endometrial cancer (EC) and have yielded inconsistent results.

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this meta-analysis is to systematically analyze the effect of green tea and black tea on EC risk.

METHODS:

PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library and China Biological Medicine Database were searched through February 2, 2015 to identify studies that met pre-stated inclusion criteria. Overall relative risk (RR) was estimated based on the highest and lowest levels of green/black tea consumption. Dose-response relationships were evaluated with the data from categories of green/black tea intake in each study.

RESULTS:

For green tea, the summary RR indicated that the highest green tea consumption was associated with a reduced risk of EC (RR 0.78, 95 % CI 0.66-0.92). Furthermore, an increase in green tea consumption of one cup per day was associated with an 11 % decreased risk of developing EC. (RR 0.89, 95 % CI 0.84-0.94). For black tea, no statistically significant association was observed in the meta-analysis (highest versus non/lowest, RR 0.99, 95 % CI 0.79-1.23; increment of one cup/day, RR 0.99, 95 % CI 0.94-1.03). The power of the estimate of green tea and black tea with risk of EC was 84.33 and 5.07 %, respectively. The quality of evidence for the association between green and black tea with EC risk was moderate and very low, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results from this meta-analysis indicate that green tea, but not black tea, may be related to a reduction of EC risk. Large population-based randomized controlled trials and large prospective cohort studies are required to obtain a definitive conclusion and determine the mechanisms underlying this association.

KEYWORDS:

Black tea; Dose–response relationship; Endometrial cancer; Green tea; Meta-analysis; Systematic review

PMID:
26138307
DOI:
10.1007/s00404-015-3811-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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