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Lancet. 2015 Sep 19;386(9999):1137-46. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(15)61134-5. Epub 2015 Jun 28.

Secukinumab, a human anti-interleukin-17A monoclonal antibody, in patients with psoriatic arthritis (FUTURE 2): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial.

Author information

1
Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. Electronic address: Iain.McInnes@glasgow.ac.uk.
2
Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
3
Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego, CA, USA.
5
Allergy/Immunology and Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.
6
Memorial University, Newfoundland, NL, Canada.
7
Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands.
8
Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, Amsterdam, and Atrium Medical Center, Heerlen, Netherlands.
9
NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
10
Department of Dermatology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.
11
Novartis Pharma, Basel, Switzerland.
12
Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA.
13
Novartis Healthcare, Hyderabad, India.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Interleukin 17A is a proinflammatory cytokine that is implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis. We assessed the efficacy and safety of subcutaneous secukinumab, a human anti-interleukin-17A monoclonal antibody, in patients with psoriatic arthritis.

METHODS:

In this phase 3, double-blind, placebo-controlled study undertaken at 76 centres in Asia, Australia, Canada, Europe, and the USA, adults (aged ≥18 years old) with active psoriatic arthritis were randomly allocated in a 1:1:1:1 ratio with computer-generated blocks to receive subcutaneous placebo or secukinumab 300 mg, 150 mg, or 75 mg once a week from baseline and then every 4 weeks from week 4. Patients and investigators were masked to treatment assignment. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving at least 20% improvement in the American College of Rheumatology response criteria (ACR20) at week 24. Analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01752634.

FINDINGS:

Between April 14, and Nov 25, 2013, 397 patients were randomly assigned to receive secukinumab 300 mg (n=100), 150 mg (n=100), 75 mg (n=99), or placebo (n=98). A significantly higher proportion of patients achieved an ACR20 at week 24 with secukinumab 300 mg (54 [54%] patients; odds ratio versus placebo 6·81, 95% CI 3·42-13·56; p<0·0001), 150 mg (51 [51%] patients; 6·52, 3·25-13·08; p<0·0001), and 75 mg (29 [29%] patients; 2·32, 1·14-4·73; p=0·0399) versus placebo (15 [15%] patients). Up to week 16, the most common adverse events were upper respiratory tract infections (four [4%], eight [8%], ten [10%], and seven [7%] with secukinumab 300 mg, 150 mg, 75 mg, and placebo, respectively) and nasopharyngitis (six [6%], four [4%], six [6%], and eight [8%], respectively). Serious adverse events were reported by five (5%), one (1%), and four (4%) patients in the secukinumab 300 mg, 150 mg, and 75 mg groups, respectively, compared with two (2%) in the placebo group. No deaths were reported.

INTERPRETATION:

Subcutaneous secukinumab 300 mg and 150 mg improved the signs and symptoms of psoriatic arthritis, suggesting that secukinumab is a potential future treatment option for patients with this disorder.

FUNDING:

Novartis.

PMID:
26135703
DOI:
10.1016/S0140-6736(15)61134-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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