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Environ Res. 2015 Oct;142:123-34. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2015.06.023. Epub 2015 Jun 30.

Perinatal exposure to chlordecone and infant growth.

Author information

1
INSERM, IRSET, UMR 1085, Rennes, France; Univ Rennes 1, Rennes, France. Electronic address: nathalie.costet@univ-rennes1.fr.
2
INSERM, IRSET, UMR 1085, Rennes, France; Univ Rennes 1, Faculté de Médecine, Département de Médecine Générale, Rennes, France. Electronic address: fabienne.pele@chu-rennes.fr.
3
Univ Rennes 1, Rennes, France; INSERM, CIC 1414, 35700 Rennes, France; INSERM, IAME, UMR 1137, F-75018 Paris, France; Univ Paris Diderot, IAME, UMR 1137, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-75018 Paris, France. Electronic address: emmanuelle.comets@inserm.fr.
4
INSERM, IRSET, UMR 1085, Rennes, France; Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital, Rennes, France. Electronic address: florence.rouget@inserm.fr.
5
INSERM, IRSET, UMR 1085, Rennes, France; Univ Rennes 1, Rennes, France. Electronic address: christine.monfort@inserm.fr.
6
EHESP, Département Épidémiologie et Biostatistiques, Rennes, France; INSERM, EPOPé, UMR1153, Center for Epidemiology and Statistics, DHU Risks in Pregnancy, Paris, France; Univ Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. Electronic address: florence.bodeau-livinec@ehesp.fr.
7
EHESP, Département Épidémiologie et Biostatistiques, Rennes, France. Electronic address: Henri.Bataille@chu-fortdefrance.fr.
8
Unité pédiatrique, CHU Pointe-à-Pitre, France. Electronic address: elsiemlinga@gmail.com.
9
INSERM, IRSET, UMR 1085, Rennes, France; Pôle Parent-Enfant, Service de Gynécologie et Obstétrique, CHU Pointe-à-Pitre, Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe, France. Electronic address: philippe.kadhel@orange.fr.
10
INSERM, IRSET, UMR 1085, Rennes, France; Univ Rennes 1, Rennes, France. Electronic address: luc.multigner@inserm.fr.
11
INSERM, IRSET, UMR 1085, Rennes, France; Univ Rennes 1, Rennes, France. Electronic address: sylvaine.cordier@inserm.fr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The intensive use of chlordecone (an organochlorine insecticide) in the French West Indies until 1993 resulted in a long-term soil and water contamination. Chlordecone has known hormonal properties and exposure through contaminated food during critical periods of development (gestation and early infancy) may affect growth.

OBJECTIVES:

We aimed to assess the impact of prenatal and postnatal exposure to chlordecone on the growth of children from the TIMOUN mother-child cohort.

METHODS:

Chlordecone was determined in cord plasma at birth (N=222) and in breast milk samples (at 3 months). Dietary chlordecone intake was estimated at 7 and 18 months, with food-frequency questionnaires and food-specific contamination data. Anthropometric measurements were taken at the 3-, 7- and 18-month visits and measurements reported in the infants' health records were noted. Structured Jenss-Bayley growth models were fitted to individual height and weight growth trajectories. The impact of exposure on growth curve parameters was estimated directly with adjusted mixed non-linear models. Weight, height and body mass index (BMI), and instantaneous height and weight growth velocities at specific ages were also analyzed relative to exposure.

RESULTS:

Chlordecone in cord blood was associated with a higher BMI in boys at 3 months, due to greater weight and lower height, and in girls at 8 and 18 months, mostly due to lower height. Postnatal exposure was associated with lower height, weight and BMI at 3, 8 and 18 months, particularly in girls.

CONCLUSION:

Chlordecone exposure may affect growth trajectories in children aged 0 to 18 months.

KEYWORDS:

Chlordecone; Growth modeling; Infant growth; Organochlorine pesticide; Prenatal exposure

PMID:
26133809
DOI:
10.1016/j.envres.2015.06.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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