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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 Nov;69(11):1226-32. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2015.103. Epub 2015 Jul 1.

Consumption of soft drinks and health-related quality of life in the adult population.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and IdiPAZ (Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Universitario La Paz), Madrid, Spain.
2
CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
3
Department of Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Public Health Area, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

Despite the accumulated evidence on the health risks associated with sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), the industry has funded mass communication strategies promoting the idea that soft drinks, including SSB, may represent a source of well-being. This study assessed the association between consumption of soft drinks and health-related quality of life (HRQL), as a proxy of well-being, in the adult population of Spain.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

The cohort was established in 2008-2010 with 8417 individuals representative of the Spanish population aged 18-60 years. Habitual soft drink consumption was assessed with a validated diet history at baseline. HRQL was measured using the SF-12 questionnaire at baseline and in a subsample of 2132 study participants in 2012. The analyses were performed using linear regression and adjusted for the main confounders.

RESULTS:

In cross-sectional analyses at baseline, those who drank ⩾1 serving/day of SSB had a lower (worse) score on the physical composite summary (PCS) of the SF-12 (adjusted linear regression coefficient: -1.08; 95% confidence interval (CI): -1.60 to -0.54) than those who drank <1 serving/week. Results were similar among individuals younger than 35 years (-1.06; 95% CI: -1.79 to -0.32), those who were not dieting (-1.21; 95% CI: -1.80 to -0.62), those who did not lose >5 kg in the previous 4 years (-0.79; 95% CI: -1.87 to 0.29), and in those without morbidity (-1.18; 95% CI: -1.91 to -0.46). Neither SSBs nor artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs) showed an association with the mental composite summary (MCS) of the SF-12. In the prospective analyses, no association was observed between baseline consumption of SSBs or ASBs and the changes in the PCS and MCS score from 2008/2010 to 2012.

CONCLUSIONS:

No evidence was found that soft drink consumption has a beneficial effect on either the physical or mental dimensions of HRQL.

PMID:
26130297
DOI:
10.1038/ejcn.2015.103
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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