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Elife. 2015 Jun 30;4:e08347. doi: 10.7554/eLife.08347.

The global distribution of the arbovirus vectors Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus.

Author information

1
Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
2
Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
3
Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, United States.
4
Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, United States.
5
National Dengue Control Program, Ministry of Health, Brasilia, Brazil.
6
European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Stockholm, Sweden.
7
Avia-GIS, Zoersel, Belgium.
8
Eijkman-Oxford Clinical Research Unit, Jakarta, Indonesia.
9
Center for Research, Diagnostics and Vaccine Development, Centers for Disease Control, Taipei, Taiwan.
10
Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, United States.
11
Environmental Research Group Oxford, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Dengue and chikungunya are increasing global public health concerns due to their rapid geographical spread and increasing disease burden. Knowledge of the contemporary distribution of their shared vectors, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus remains incomplete and is complicated by an ongoing range expansion fuelled by increased global trade and travel. Mapping the global distribution of these vectors and the geographical determinants of their ranges is essential for public health planning. Here we compile the largest contemporary database for both species and pair it with relevant environmental variables predicting their global distribution. We show Aedes distributions to be the widest ever recorded; now extensive in all continents, including North America and Europe. These maps will help define the spatial limits of current autochthonous transmission of dengue and chikungunya viruses. It is only with this kind of rigorous entomological baseline that we can hope to project future health impacts of these viruses.

KEYWORDS:

Ae. aegypti; Ae. albopictus; Aedes; ecology; epidemiology; global health

PMID:
26126267
PMCID:
PMC4493616
DOI:
10.7554/eLife.08347
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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