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Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2015 Oct;153(4):649-55. doi: 10.1177/0194599815591531. Epub 2015 Jun 29.

Using Polysomnography and Airway Evaluation to Predict Successful Decannulation in Children.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA Neepa.Gurbani@cchmc.org.
2
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Royal Army Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Otolaryngology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical, Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Decannulation readiness is approached in several ways and is tailored to the individual patient. While microlaryngoscopy and bronchoscopy evaluate airway patency at all levels, polysomnography assesses sleep-related upper airway physiology. There are limited data in the literature on the utility of these tools. Thus, the main objectives of this study were (1) to identify sleep and respiratory parameters associated with successful decannulation and (2) to determine the agreement between microlaryngoscopy and bronchoscopy and polysomnography.

STUDY DESIGN:

Case series with chart review.

SETTING:

Quaternary care pediatric hospital.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

A retrospective review of medical records, microlaryngoscopy and bronchoscopy, and polysomnographs was performed on subjects preparing for decannulation from 2005 to 2010. Fifty-nine subjects who underwent overnight polysomnography with a tracheostomy capping trial and microlaryngoscopy and bronchoscopy were included. Prediction of successful decannulation from polysomnography parameters was determined using logistic regression analysis.

RESULTS:

Fifty-nine subjects with a total of 78 polysomnographs were subdivided into 2 groups: 42 polysomnographs were classified as successfully decannulated, and 36 polysomnographs belonged to the group that did not decannulate. Logistic regression analysis determined that the Apnea Hypopnea Index (P = .0423) and maximal end-tidal CO2 (P = .046) were significant predictors for successful decannulation.

CONCLUSION:

Airway evaluation by microlaryngoscopy and bronchoscopy is an essential tool in the assessment of decannulation readiness. Polysomnography is an important additional tool for children with complex airway problems. Our results indicate that certain polysomnographic parameters such as Apnea Hypopnea Index and maximal end-tidal CO2 are valuable in predicting successful tracheostomy decannulation.

KEYWORDS:

microlaryngoscopy and bronchoscopy; polysomnography; tracheostomy decannulation

PMID:
26124266
DOI:
10.1177/0194599815591531
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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