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Pediatrics. 2015 Jul;136(1):154-60. doi: 10.1542/peds.2014-3856.

Persistent Pneumonia in an Infant.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Sections of Infectious Diseases.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Allergy and Immunology.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Genetics, and.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Hospitalist Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois elizabeth_r_vanOpstal@rush.edu.

Abstract

A 4-month-old boy with past medical history of eczema presented with fever and cough; a chest radiograph showed lung consolidation, and he was initially treated with amoxicillin for presumed community-acquired pneumonia. After several days, his fever persisted. He was also profoundly anemic. Antibiotic coverage was broadened because of the concern for resistant organisms; he began to improve and was discharged from the hospital. However, at 5 months of age, his fever returned, and he continued to demonstrate lung consolidation on chest radiograph. Additionally, he had lost weight and continued to be anemic. Splenic cysts were noted on abdominal ultrasound. He was diagnosed with an unusual etiology for his pneumonia and improved with the appropriate therapy. An underlying immunodeficiency was suspected, but initial testing was nondiagnostic. At 12 months of age, he presented with another infection, and the final diagnosis was made.

PMID:
26122810
PMCID:
PMC4485008
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2014-3856
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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