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Am J Occup Ther. 2015 Mar-Apr;69(2):6902290030p1-8. doi: 10.5014/ajot.2015.014266.

Clinical Reasoning Guideline for Home Modification Interventions.

Author information

1
Susan L. Stark, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is an Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy, Neurology and Social Work, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; starks@wusm.wustl.edu.
2
Emily Somerville, MSOT, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.
3
Marian Keglovits, OTD, MSCI, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.
4
Aliza Smason, OTD, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, Ministry of Education, Jerusalem, Israel.
5
Kelsey Bigham, MSOT, OTRl/L, is Occupational Therapist, Jones Therapy Services, Nashville, TN.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to develop and validate a clinical reasoning tool to describe an occupational therapist's clinical reasoning process while delivering home modification interventions.

METHOD:

We used a two-phase, mixed-methods approach. In Phase 1, we developed a personal factors guideline to support clinical reasoning in home modification interventions based on in-depth interviews, a focus group, and field observations of 6 home modification experts. In Phase 2, the guideline was validated by a second group of 6 home modification experts.

RESULTS:

During analysis, 16 personal and environmental factors with a corresponding set of conditions and strategies for each factor emerged to form a clinical reasoning guideline, which was validated by a second group of experts.

CONCLUSION:

Unpacking the "black box" of the clinical reasoning process has yielded a useful clinical reasoning tool that will allow occupational therapists to deliver complex interventions with fidelity.

PMID:
26122687
DOI:
10.5014/ajot.2015.014266
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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