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Nat Neurosci. 2015 Aug;18(8):1081-3. doi: 10.1038/nn.4053. Epub 2015 Jun 29.

Different immune cells mediate mechanical pain hypersensitivity in male and female mice.

Author information

1
1] Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. [2] Department of Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA.
2
1] Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. [2] Program in Neuroscience and Mental Health, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [3] Department of Physiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [4] University of Toronto Centre for the Study of Pain, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
4
1] Program in Neuroscience and Mental Health, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Department of Physiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [3] University of Toronto Centre for the Study of Pain, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
5
Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA.
6
Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
7
Program in Cell Biology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
8
Program in Neuroscience and Mental Health, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
9
1] Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. [2] Alan Edwards Centre for Research on Pain, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
10
1] Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. [2] Alan Edwards Centre for Research on Pain, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Abstract

A large and rapidly increasing body of evidence indicates that microglia-to-neuron signaling is essential for chronic pain hypersensitivity. Using multiple approaches, we found that microglia are not required for mechanical pain hypersensitivity in female mice; female mice achieved similar levels of pain hypersensitivity using adaptive immune cells, likely T lymphocytes. This sexual dimorphism suggests that male mice cannot be used as proxies for females in pain research.

PMID:
26120961
PMCID:
PMC4772157
DOI:
10.1038/nn.4053
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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