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Cell Microbiol. 2015 Dec;17(12):1868-82. doi: 10.1111/cmi.12478. Epub 2015 Jul 16.

Plasmodium falciparum adhesion domains linked to severe malaria differ in blockade of endothelial protein C receptor.

Author information

1
Center for Infectious Disease Research (formerly Seattle Biomedical Research Institute), Seattle, WA, USA.
2
Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, Goa Medical College and Hospital, Bambolim, Goa, India.
4
Coagulation Biology Laboratory, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK, USA.
5
Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

Abstract

Cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) is associated with severe malaria. It has been postulated that parasite binding could exacerbate microvascular coagulation and endothelial dysfunction in cerebral malaria by impairing the protein C-EPCR interaction, but the extent of binding inhibition has not been fully determined. Here we expressed the cysteine-rich interdomain region (CIDRα1) domain from a variety of domain cassette (DC) 8 and DC13 P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 proteins and show they interact in a distinct manner with EPCR resulting in weak, moderate and strong inhibition of the activated protein C (APC)-EPCR interaction. Overall, there was a positive correlation between CIDRα1-EPCR binding activity and APC blockade activity. In addition, our analysis from a combination of mutagenesis and blocking antibodies finds that an Arg81 (R81) in EPCR plays a pivotal role in CIDRα1 binding, but domains with weak and strong APC blockade activity were distinguished by their sensitivity to inhibition by anti-EPCR mAb 1535, implying subtle differences in their binding footprints. These data reveal a previously unknown functional heterogeneity in the interaction between P. falciparum and EPCR and have major implications for understanding the distinct clinical pathologies of cerebral malaria and developing new treatment strategies.

PMID:
26118955
PMCID:
PMC4661071
DOI:
10.1111/cmi.12478
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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