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J Sci Med Sport. 2016 Jun;19(6):465-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2015.06.005. Epub 2015 Jun 16.

Interventions preventing ankle sprains; previous injury and high-risk sport participation as predictors of compliance.

Author information

1
Department of Public & Occupational Health and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081, Amsterdam BT, The Netherlands; Department of Sport and Exercise Medicine, De Sportartsengroep, Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Jan Tooropstraat 164, 1061, Amsterdam, AE, The Netherlands. Electronic address: kasperjanssen@thesportsphysician.nl.
2
Department of General practice and Elderly care medicine and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081, Amsterdam, BT, The Netherlands.
3
Australian Centre for Research into Injury in Sport and its Prevention (ACRISP), Federation University Australia, PO Box 668, Ballarat, VIC, 3353, Australia.
4
Department of Public & Occupational Health and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081, Amsterdam BT, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To describe the association between participants' person-related potential predictor variables and cumulative compliance with interventions for preventing ankle sprains: neuromuscular training, wearing an ankle brace, and a combined training and bracing.

DESIGN:

Secondary analysis of compliance data from a randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing measures preventing ankle ligament injuries.

METHODS:

Ordinal regression with a backward selection method was used to obtain a descriptive statistical model linking participants' person-related potential predictor variables with the monthly cumulative compliance measurements for three interventions preventing ankle ligament injuries.

RESULTS:

Having had a previous ankle injury was significantly associated with a higher compliance with all of the preventive measures trialed. Overall compliance with bracing and the combined intervention was significantly lower than the compliance with NM training. Per group analysis found that participating in a high-risk sport, like soccer, basketball, and volleyball, was significantly associated with a higher compliance with bracing, or a combined bracing and NM training. In contrast, participating in a high-risk sport was significantly associated with a lower per group compliance with NM training.

CONCLUSIONS:

Future studies should include at least registration of previous ankle sprains, sport participation (high- or low-risk), experience in NM training, and hours of sport exposure as possible predictors of compliance with interventions preventing ankle sprains. Practitioners should take into account these variables when prescribing preventive neuromuscular training or bracing.

KEYWORDS:

Ankle injuries; Braces; Ligament sprain; Neuromuscular training; Sports

PMID:
26118849
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsams.2015.06.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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