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J Fluency Disord. 2015 Sep;45:12-26. doi: 10.1016/j.jfludis.2015.05.004. Epub 2015 Jun 1.

Relation of motor, linguistic and temperament factors in epidemiologic subtypes of persistent and recovered stuttering: Initial findings.

Author information

1
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, United States. Electronic address: nambrose@illinois.edu.
2
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, United States.
3
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, United States.
4
Eastern Illinois University, United States.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of any patterns reflecting underlying subtypes of persistence and recovery across epidemiologic, motor, language, and temperament domains in the same group of children beginning to stutter and followed for several years.

METHODS:

Participants were 58 2-4-year-old CWS and 40 age and gender matched NFC from four different sites in the Midwest. At the end of the multi-year study, stuttering children were classified as Persistent or Recovered. The same protocol obtaining data to measure stuttering, motor, language and temperament characteristics was used at each site. They have not been included in previous reports.

RESULTS:

The Persistent group performed consistently differently from the Recovered and Control groups. They performed lower on standardized language tests and in phonological accuracy, had greater kinematic variability, and were judged by their parents to be more negative in temperament.

CONCLUSIONS:

The present study provides data supporting the hypothesis that subtypes of stuttering can be identified along persistency/recovery lines, but results were not definitive.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES:

Readers will be able to (a) describe the current state of subtypes of stuttering research; (b) summarize possible contributions of epidemiologic, motoric, linguistic and temperament to such subtyping with regard to persistency and recovery.

KEYWORDS:

Longitudinal; Persistence and recovery; Stuttering; Subtypes

PMID:
26117417
PMCID:
PMC4546885
DOI:
10.1016/j.jfludis.2015.05.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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