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Curr Opin Plant Biol. 2015 Aug;26:57-63. doi: 10.1016/j.pbi.2015.05.031. Epub 2015 Jun 25.

Plant cysteine-rich peptides that inhibit pathogen growth and control rhizobial differentiation in legume nodules.

Author information

1
Institute of Biochemistry, Biological Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Temesvári krt. 62., Szeged 6726, Hungary.
2
John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7UH, UK.
3
Institute of Biochemistry, Biological Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Temesvári krt. 62., Szeged 6726, Hungary. Electronic address: kondorosi.eva@brc.mta.hu.

Abstract

Plants must co-exist with both pathogenic and beneficial microbes. Antimicrobial peptides with broad antimicrobial activities represent one of the first lines of defense against pathogens. Many plant cysteine-rich peptides with potential antimicrobial properties have been predicted. Amongst them, defensins and defensin-like peptides are the most abundant and plants can express several hundreds of them. In some rhizobial-legume symbioses special defensin-like peptides, the nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides have evolved in those legumes whose symbiotic partner terminally differentiates. In Medicago truncatula, >700 NCRs exist and collectively act as plant effectors inducing irreversible differentiation of rhizobia to nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Cationic NCR peptides have a broad range of potent antimicrobial activities but do not kill the endosymbionts.

PMID:
26116977
DOI:
10.1016/j.pbi.2015.05.031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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