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J Pediatr. 2015 Sep;167(3):572-8.e1-2. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.05.037. Epub 2015 Jun 24.

Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Dobutamine for Low Superior Vena Cava Flow in Infants.

Author information

1
Department of Neonatology, La Paz University Hospital, Madrid, Spain.
2
Department of Neonatology, La Paz University Hospital, Madrid, Spain; Department of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, Polytechnic University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
3
Division of Statistics, La Paz University Hospital, Madrid, Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To gather information for a future confirmatory trial of dobutamine (DB) for circulatory impairment (ie, low superior vena cava [SVC] flow).

STUDY DESIGN:

A total of 127 infants born at < 31 weeks gestational age were serially scanned from birth to 96 hours after birth. The infants were randomly assigned to 2 groups and were treated with DB (stepwise dose increase, 5-10-15-20 μg/kg/min) or placebo if they had an SVC flow < 41 mL/kg/min within the first 24 hours after birth. The primary outcome measures were the achievement and maintenance of an SVC flow ≥ 41 mL/kg/min. Secondary outcome measures were the short-term evolution of clinical and biochemical variables, near-infrared spectroscopy, cranial Doppler ultrasound, and clinical outcomes.

RESULTS:

SVC flow increased throughout the first 96 hours for the entire cohort. All of the randomized infants (n = 28) except 2 achieved and maintained an SVC flow ≥ 41 mL/kg/min after intervention; however, the infants treated with DB (n = 16) showed a higher heart rate and improved base excess compared with those treated with placebo (n = 12). Low SVC flow was associated with low gestational age (P = .02) and poor condition at birth (P = .02). Low SVC flow significantly increased the risk of severe ischemic events (OR, 13; 95% CI, 2.4-69.2; P < .01).

CONCLUSION:

This exploratory trial demonstrates a tendency toward improved short-term clinical and biochemical perfusion variable outcomes in infants with low SVC flow treated with DB.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01605279) and the European Clinical Trials Database (EurodraCT 2009-010901-35).

PMID:
26116470
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.05.037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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