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Schizophr Res. 2015 Aug;166(1-3):60-4. doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2015.05.020. Epub 2015 Jun 24.

Metacognitive profiles in individuals with a first episode of psychosis and their relation to social functioning and perceived social support.

Author information

1
Université de Montréal, Department of Psychology, C-358, 90 Vincent d'Indy Street, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada.
2
Université de Montréal, Department of Psychology, C-358, 90 Vincent d'Indy Street, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada. Electronic address: tania.lecomte@umontreal.ca.

Abstract

Poorer metacognitive abilities are recognized as strong predictors of social functioning deficits in individuals with schizophrenia, but have not been studied in relation to perceived social support. Furthermore, traditional measures of metacognition fail to consider ecological aspects such as the interaction between thinking of one's own or other's mind, and mastery. As a constellation, these abilities may influence domains of social functioning and perceived social support differently. Therefore, this study aimed to establish whether distinct metacognitive profiles exist within a population of individuals with a first psychotic episode, and to determine how such profiles influence individual domains of social functioning and perceived social support. Participants (n=50) were recruited from two early psychosis outpatient clinics in Montreal, Canada. Demographic information, social functioning and perceived social support were measured using self-reported questionnaires, and metacognition was scored from the transcripts of a semi-structured interview designed to avoid leading responses. Cluster analysis revealed three distinct metacognitive profiles: (1) overall better abilities; (2) poor abilities on thinking of one's own and other's mind, but better mastery; and (3) overall poorer abilities. Analyses showed significant differences between profiles only for self-reported intimacy and independent living abilities, with the second profile showing better abilities than the third. Profiles did not simply represent consistently higher or lower functioning across subscales. Although mastery was predictive of social functioning, the ability to think in an increasingly complex manner of one's self and others did not seem to improve functioning in individuals with a first episode of psychosis.

KEYWORDS:

Metacognition; Psychosis; Social functioning

PMID:
26116327
DOI:
10.1016/j.schres.2015.05.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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