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Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2015 Sep 1;309(5):L475-87. doi: 10.1152/ajplung.00060.2015. Epub 2015 Jun 26.

Junctional abnormalities in human airway epithelial cells expressing F508del CFTR.

Author information

1
Emory+Children's Center for Cystic Fibrosis and Airways Disease Research, Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia; Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia; Department of Cell Biology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia; and s.a.molina@emory.edu.
2
Emory+Children's Center for Cystic Fibrosis and Airways Disease Research, Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia; Division of Pulmonary, Allergy/Immunology, Cystic Fibrosis, and Sleep, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia.
3
Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia;
4
Emory+Children's Center for Cystic Fibrosis and Airways Disease Research, Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia; Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia; Department of Cell Biology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia; and.

Abstract

Cystic fibrosis (CF) has a profound impact on airway physiology. Accumulating evidence suggests that intercellular junctions are impaired in CF. We examined changes to CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function, tight junctions, and gap junctions in NuLi-1 (CFTR(wt/wt)) and CuFi-5 (CFTR(ΔF508/ΔF508)) cells. Cells were studied at air-liquid interface (ALI) and compared with primary human bronchial epithelial cells. On the basis of fluorescent lectin binding, the phenotype of the NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells at week 8 resembled that of serous, glycoprotein-rich airway cells. After week 7, CuFi-5 cells possessed 130% of the epithelial Na(+) channel activity and 17% of the CFTR activity of NuLi-1 cells. In both cell types, expression levels of CFTR were comparable to those in primary airway epithelia. Transepithelial resistance of NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells stabilized during maturation in ALI culture, with significantly lower transepithelial resistance for CuFi-5 than NuLi-1 cells. We also found that F508del CFTR negatively affects gap junction function in the airway. NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells express the connexins Cx43 and Cx26. While both connexins were properly trafficked by NuLi-1 cells, Cx43 was mistrafficked by CuFi-5 cells. Cx43 trafficking was rescued in CuFi-5 cells treated with 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA), as assessed by intracellular dye transfer. 4-PBA-treated CuFi-5 cells also exhibited an increase in forskolin-induced CFTR-mediated currents. The Cx43 trafficking defect was confirmed using IB3-1 cells and found to be corrected by 4-PBA treatment. These data support the use of NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells to examine the effects of F508del CFTR expression on tight junction and gap junction function in the context of serous human airway cells.

KEYWORDS:

air-liquid culture; cell model; connexin; cystic fibrosis; differentiation; gap junction; normal lung

PMID:
26115671
PMCID:
PMC4556929
DOI:
10.1152/ajplung.00060.2015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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