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J Sport Rehabil. 2015 Nov;24(4):342-8. doi: 10-1123/jsr.2014-0190. Epub 2015 Jun 24.

The Effects of Doming of the Diaphragm in Subjects With Short-Hamstring Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Author information

1
Dept of Physiotherapy, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Taking into account the complex structure of the diaphragm and its important role in the postural chain, the authors were prompted to check the effects of a diaphragm technique on hamstring flexibility.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effects of the doming-of-the-diaphragm (DD) technique on hamstrings flexibility and spine mobility.

DESIGN:

Randomized placebo-controlled trial.

SETTING:

University laboratory.

PATIENTS:

Sixty young adults with short-hamstring syndrome were included in this randomized clinical trial using a between-groups design.

INTERVENTION:

The sample was randomly allocated to a placebo group (n = 30) or an intervention group (n = 30). Duration, position, and therapist were the same for both treatments.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Hamstring flexibility was assessed using the forward-flexion-distance (FFD) and popliteal-angle test (PAT). Spinal motion was evaluated using the modified Schober test and cervical range of movement.

RESULTS:

Two-way ANOVA afforded pre- to postintervention statistically significant differences (P < .001) in the intervention group compared with the placebo group for hamstring flexibility measured by the FFD (mean change 4.59 ± 5.66 intervention group vs 0.71 ± 2.41 placebo group) and the PAT (mean change intervention group 6.81 ± 8.52 vs placebo group 0.57 ± 4.41). Significant differences (P < .05) were also found in the modified Schober test (mean change intervention group -1.34 ± 3.95 vs placebo group 1.02 ± 3.05) and cervical range of movement. Significant between-groups differences (P < .05) were also found in all the variables measured.

CONCLUSIONS:

The DD technique provides sustained improvement in hamstring flexibility and spine mobility.

PMID:
26115420
DOI:
10-1123/jsr.2014-0190
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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