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ACS Nano. 2015 Jul 28;9(7):6644-54. doi: 10.1021/acsnano.5b03569. Epub 2015 Jun 26.

Accelerating the Translation of Nanomaterials in Biomedicine.

Author information

1
†Center for Bioengineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106, United States.
2
‡Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, United States.
3
§National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, United States.
4
∥Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119077.
5
⊥Division of Oral Biology and Medicine, UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, California 90095, United States.
6
#Division of Molecular Pharmaceutics and Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, United States.
7
¶Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, United States.
8
□Departments of Materials Engineering and Bioengineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8654, Japan.
9
■Department of Chemistry and International Institute for Nanotechnology, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States.
10
●Department of Materials, Department of Bioengineering, Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, U.K.
11
△Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912, United States.
12
▼The Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, United States.
13
⬡Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China.
14
⬢Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, United States.
15
††Division of Molecular Pharmaceutics and Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, United States.
16
‡‡Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27695, United States.

Abstract

Due to their size and tailorable physicochemical properties, nanomaterials are an emerging class of structures utilized in biomedical applications. There are now many prominent examples of nanomaterials being used to improve human health, in areas ranging from imaging and diagnostics to therapeutics and regenerative medicine. An overview of these examples reveals several common areas of synergy and future challenges. This Nano Focus discusses the current status and future potential of promising nanomaterials and their translation from the laboratory to the clinic, by highlighting a handful of successful examples.

PMID:
26115196
PMCID:
PMC5227554
DOI:
10.1021/acsnano.5b03569
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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