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Eur Respir J. 2015 Oct;46(4):1104-12. doi: 10.1183/13993003.02325-2014. Epub 2015 Jun 25.

Tuberculosis associates with both airflow obstruction and low lung function: BOLD results.

Author information

1
Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, UK a.amaral@imperial.ac.uk.
2
Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, UK.
3
University of British Columbia Heart Lung Innovation Center, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
4
Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria.
5
Department of Medical Sciences: Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
6
Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
7
Division of Pulmonary Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA.
8
Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
9
Oregon Health & Sciences University, Portland, OR, USA.
10
Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, UK For a list of the BOLD collaborators see the Acknowledgements.

Abstract

In small studies and cases series, a history of tuberculosis has been associated with both airflow obstruction, which is characteristic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and restrictive patterns on spirometry. The objective of the present study was to assess the association between a history of tuberculosis and airflow obstruction and spirometric abnormalities in adults.The study was performed in adults, aged 40 years and above, who took part in the multicentre, cross-sectional, general population-based Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease study, and had provided acceptable post-bronchodilator spirometry measurements and information on a history of tuberculosis. The associations between a history of tuberculosis and airflow obstruction and spirometric restriction were assessed within each participating centre, and estimates combined using meta-analysis. These estimates were stratified by high- and low/middle-income countries, according to gross national income.A self-reported history of tuberculosis was associated with airflow obstruction (adjusted odds ratio 2.51, 95% CI 1.83-3.42) and spirometric restriction (adjusted odds ratio 2.13, 95% CI 1.42-3.19).A history of tuberculosis was associated with both airflow obstruction and spirometric restriction, and should be considered as a potentially important cause of obstructive disease and low lung function, particularly where tuberculosis is common.

PMID:
26113680
PMCID:
PMC4594762
DOI:
10.1183/13993003.02325-2014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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