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Clin Psychol Rev. 2015 Aug;40:123-37. doi: 10.1016/j.cpr.2015.05.009. Epub 2015 Jun 4.

Differential effects of behavioral interventions with a graded physical activity component in patients suffering from Chronic Fatigue (Syndrome): An updated systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Health and Medical Psychology Unit, Leiden University, The Netherlands; Research I&D Psychology and Health Unit (UIPES), ISPA-University Institute, Lisbon, Portugal; Interdisciplinary Centre for the Study of Human Performance (CIPER), Faculty of Human Kinetics, University of Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address: mmarques@ispa.pt.
2
Health and Medical Psychology Unit, Leiden University, The Netherlands.
3
Research I&D Psychology and Health Unit (UIPES), ISPA-University Institute, Lisbon, Portugal.

Abstract

An updated systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to (1) evaluate the effects of behavioral and psychological interventions containing a graded physical activity component upon fatigue severity, physical functioning, physical activity and psychological distress, and to (2) examine potential moderator effects of trial characteristics (type of control, setting, provider, length of treatment, psychological component, flexibility in physical activity, and minimal face to face patient-provider contact). Pertinent content of selected studies was extracted and rated on a scale of methodological quality. Sixteen randomized controlled trials (N=2004) were included in the meta-analyses. Significant small to medium effect sizes (Hedge's g=0.25 to g=0.66) were found for all outcomes at post-treatment (M=5.2months) and follow-up (M=11.7months), with the exception of physical activity at post-treatment (g=0.11). The largest effects were found for fatigue severity (g=0.61 to g=0.66). Subgroup analyses revealed that minimal contact interventions had additional beneficial effects upon fatigue (g=0.96) and depression (g=0.85). Interventions provided by psychologists-psychotherapists and interventions conducted in secondary-tertiary settings also resulted in more beneficial effects on fatigue. We found some indication of publication bias. The small number of studies and variability between them are limitations of this study. Future research should explore additional moderating effects in order to improve the effectiveness of interventions.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic fatigue; Graded physical activity/exercise; Interventions; Meta-analysis; Moderators; Psychological

PMID:
26112761
DOI:
10.1016/j.cpr.2015.05.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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