Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Trends Ecol Evol. 2015 Aug;30(8):477-86. doi: 10.1016/j.tree.2015.05.007. Epub 2015 Jun 22.

Symbiotic options for the conquest of land.

Author information

1
School of Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK.
2
Department of Life Sciences, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, SW7 5BD, UK.
3
Department of Life Sciences, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, SW7 5BD, UK; Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, TW9 3DS, UK; Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK.
4
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, TW9 3DS, UK; Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK. Electronic address: m.bidartondo@imperial.ac.uk.

Abstract

The domination of the landmasses of Earth by plants starting during the Ordovician Period drastically altered the development of the biosphere and the composition of the atmosphere, with far-reaching consequences for all life ever since. It is widely thought that symbiotic soil fungi facilitated the colonization of the terrestrial environment by plants. However, recent discoveries in molecular ecology, physiology, cytology, and paleontology have brought into question the hitherto-assumed identity and biology of the fungi engaged in symbiosis with the earliest-diverging lineages of extant land plants. Here, we reconsider the existing paradigm and show that the symbiotic options available to the first plants emerging onto the land were more varied than previously thought.

KEYWORDS:

fungi; mutualism; mycorrhiza; paleobotany; plant evolution; symbiosis

PMID:
26111583
DOI:
10.1016/j.tree.2015.05.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for Spiral, Imperial College Digital Repository
Loading ...
Support Center