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J Perinatol. 2015 Oct;35(10):875-9. doi: 10.1038/jp.2015.70. Epub 2015 Jun 25.

Ethics and professionalism education during neonatal-perinatal fellowship training in the United States.

Author information

1
Division of Newborn Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
2
Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objectives of this study were to determine the perceived adequacy of ethics and professionalism education for neonatal-perinatal fellows in the United States, and to measure confidence of fellows and recent graduates when navigating ethical issues.

STUDY DESIGN:

Neonatal-Perinatal Fellowship Directors, fellows and recent graduates were surveyed regarding the quality and type of such education during training, and perceived confidence of fellows/graduates in confronting ethical dilemmas.

RESULT:

Forty-six of 97 Directors (47%) and 82 of 444 fellows/graduates (18%) completed the surveys. Over 97% of respondents agreed that ethics training is 'important/very important'. Only 63% of Directors and 37% of fellows/graduates rated ethics education as 'excellent/very good' (P=0.004). While 96% of Directors reported teaching of ethics, only 70% of fellows/graduates reported such teaching (P<0.001). Teaching methods and their perceived effectiveness varied widely.

CONCLUSION:

Training in ethics and professionalism for fellows is important, yet currently insufficient; a more standardized curriculum may be beneficial to ensure that trainees achieve competency.

PMID:
26110498
DOI:
10.1038/jp.2015.70
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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