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J Peripher Nerv Syst. 2015 Sep;20(3):277-88. doi: 10.1111/jns.12127.

Comparing the NIS vs. MRC and INCAT sensory scale through Rasch analyses.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Clinical Genetics, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Neurology, Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Neurology, St. Elizabeth's Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Department of Neurology, Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
6
Department of Neurological Sciences, Milan University, Humanitas Clinical Institute, Rozzano, Milan, Italy.
7
Department of Neurology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA.
8
Department of Neurology, Hôpital de la Salpêtrière, Paris, France.
9
Department of Neurology, Catholique University of Louvain, Louvain, Belgium.
10
Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Neuromuscular Diseases Unit National Neurological Institute "Carlo Besta", 3rd Neurology Unit, Milan, Italy.
11
Department of Neurology, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
12
Department of Neurology, Centre for Neuromuscular Disease, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, UK.
13
Department of Neurology, Centre de Référence des Maladies Neuromusculaires et de la SLA, Hôpital de La Timone, Marseille, France.
14
Department of Neurology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
15
Department of Neurology, London Health Science Center, London, ON, Canada.
16
Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
17
Department of Neurology, Spaarne Hospital, Hoofddorp, The Netherlands.

Abstract

We performed a comparison between Neuropathy Impairment Scale-sensory (NISs) vs. the modified Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment sensory scale (mISS), and NIS-motor vs. the Medical Research Council sum score in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), and IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance-related polyneuropathy (MGUSP). The ordinal data were subjected to Rasch analyses, creating Rasch-transformed (RT)-intervals for all measures. Comparison between measures was based on validity/reliability with an emphasis on responsiveness (using the patient's level of change related to the individually obtained varying SE for minimum clinically important difference). Eighty stable patients (GBS: 30, CIDP: 30, and MGUSP: 20) were assessed twice (entry: two observers; 2-4 weeks later: one observer), and 137 newly diagnosed or relapsing patients (GBS: 55, CIDP: 59, and IgM-MGUSP: 23) were serially examined with 12 months follow-up. Data modifications were needed to improve model fit for all measures. The sensory and motor scales demonstrated approximately equal and acceptable validity and reliability scores. Responsiveness scores were poor but slightly higher in RT-mISS compared to RT-NISs. Responsiveness was equal for the RT-motor scales, but higher in GBS compared to CIDP; responsiveness was poor in patients with MGUSP, suggesting a longer duration of follow-up in the latter group of patients.

KEYWORDS:

MRC; NIS; Rasch; mISS; responsiveness

PMID:
26110493
DOI:
10.1111/jns.12127
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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