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Nat Commun. 2015 Jun 25;6:7526. doi: 10.1038/ncomms8526.

Cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic processes coupled by myosin II in dendritic cells.

Author information

1
Inserm U932, Institut Curie, 26 rue d'Ulm, 75248 Paris cedex 05, France.
2
CNRS UMR144, Institut Curie, 26 rue d'Ulm, 75248 Paris cedex 05, France.
3
CNRS UMR3215/Inserm U934, Institut Curie, 26 rue d'Ulm, 75248 Paris cedex 05, France.
4
Laboratory of Molecular Cardiology, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
5
Institute of Science and Technology Austria, Am Campus 1, 3400 Klosterneuburg, Austria.
6
National Jewish Health &University of Colorado, 1250 14th Street, Denver, USA.
7
CNRS UMR 7600, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 7600 Paris, France.
8
1] CNRS UMR 7600, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 7600 Paris, France [2] CNRS FRE 3231, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris, France.

Abstract

The immune response relies on the migration of leukocytes and on their ability to stop in precise anatomical locations to fulfil their task. How leukocyte migration and function are coordinated is unknown. Here we show that in immature dendritic cells, which patrol their environment by engulfing extracellular material, cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic. This antagonism results from transient enrichment of myosin IIA at the cell front, which disrupts the back-to-front gradient of the motor protein, slowing down locomotion but promoting antigen capture. We further highlight that myosin IIA enrichment at the cell front requires the MHC class II-associated invariant chain (Ii). Thus, by controlling myosin IIA localization, Ii imposes on dendritic cells an intermittent antigen capture behaviour that might facilitate environment patrolling. We propose that the requirement for myosin II in both cell migration and specific cell functions may provide a general mechanism for their coordination in time and space.

PMID:
26109323
PMCID:
PMC4491822
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms8526
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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