Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Commun. 2015 Jun 25;6:7344. doi: 10.1038/ncomms8344.

Lucilia cuprina genome unlocks parasitic fly biology to underpin future interventions.

Author information

1
Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia.
2
Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.
3
School of Biosciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia.
4
Structural Chemistry Program, Eskitis Institute for Drug Discovery, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland 4111, Australia.
5
Department of Genetic Medicine and Development, University of Geneva &Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland.
6
Ecosciences Precinct, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI), Queensland Bioscience Precinct, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia.
7
CSIRO Agriculture Flagship, Queensland Bioscience Precinct, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4067, Australia.

Abstract

Lucilia cuprina is a parasitic fly of major economic importance worldwide. Larvae of this fly invade their animal host, feed on tissues and excretions and progressively cause severe skin disease (myiasis). Here we report the sequence and annotation of the 458-megabase draft genome of Lucilia cuprina. Analyses of this genome and the 14,544 predicted protein-encoding genes provide unique insights into the fly's molecular biology, interactions with the host animal and insecticide resistance. These insights have broad implications for designing new methods for the prevention and control of myiasis.

PMID:
26108605
PMCID:
PMC4491171
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms8344
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center