Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2016 Jul;26(7):739-44. doi: 10.1111/sms.12505. Epub 2015 Jun 24.

Risk factors of hand climbing-related injuries.

Author information

1
Sports Medicine Research Laboratory, Luxembourg Institute of Health, Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
2
EA 3450 DevAH - Développement, Adaptation et Handicap - Faculté de Médecine et UFR STAPS, Université de Lorraine, Nancy, France.
3
Laboratoire d'Analyse de la Posture, de l'Equilibration et de la Motricité (LAPEM), CHU de Nancy, Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy, France.
4
EMGO + Institute for Health and Care Research, Department of general practice and elderly care medicine, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
5
Cabinet de kinésithérapie, Barcelonnette, France.
6
Institut Lorrain de Formation en Masso-Kinésithérapie (ILFMK) de Nancy, Nancy, France.

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the protective mechanisms or risk factors that can be related to the occurrence of hand climbing-related injuries (CRIH ). CRIH (tendon, pulley, muscle, and joint injuries) were retrospectively screened in 528 adult climbers. The questionnaire contained anthropometric items (e.g., body mass index - BMI), as well as items regarding climbing and basic training activities (warm-up, cool-down and session durations, number of session per week, hydration, practice level, climbing surface, and duration of the cardiovascular training). Higher skilled climbers and climbers with BMI above 21 kg/m(2) were more likely to have experienced CRIH (P < 0.01). Climbers with BMI above 20 kg/m(2) were more likely to have tendon injuries while those with a BMI above 21 kg/m(2) were more likely to have pulley injuries (P < 0.01). Skilled climbers, who climb more difficult routes, may use smaller grip size and a reduced number of fingers. Higher BMI will require a higher force to climb. Both high level and elevated BMI may increase the demands to the hands and fingers leading to CRIH . These risk factors are difficult to address as we cannot recommend the climbers to climb easier routes and decrease their BMI below 20 kg/m(2) .

KEYWORDS:

Climbers; fingers; risk factor; traumatology

PMID:
26105683
DOI:
10.1111/sms.12505
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center