Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Br J Sports Med. 2015 Oct;49(20):1305-10. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2014-093962. Epub 2015 Jun 23.

Isokinetic muscle strength and readiness to return to sport following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: is there an association? A systematic review and a protocol recommendation.

Author information

1
Sports Medicine Department, Sports Surgery Clinic, Dublin, Ireland.
2
Sports Medicine Department, Sports Surgery Clinic, Dublin, Ireland Department of Life Sciences, Roehampton University, London, UK.
3
Department of Life Sciences, Roehampton University, London, UK.
4
Sports Medicine Department, Sports Surgery Clinic, Dublin, Ireland Insight Centre for Data Analytics, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland.
5
Sports Medicine Department, Sports Surgery Clinic, Dublin, Ireland Department of Medicine, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
6
Sports Medicine Department, Sports Surgery Clinic, Dublin, Ireland Centre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), strength is a key variable in regaining full function of the knee. Isokinetic strength is commonly used as part of the return to sport (RTS) criteria.

AIM:

We systematically reviewed the isokinetic strength evaluation protocols that are currently being used following ACLR. A secondary aim was to suggest an isokinetic protocol that could meet RTS criteria.

METHOD:

Articles were searched using ScienceDirect, PubMed and Sage Journals Online, combined with cross-checked reference lists of the publications. Protocol data and outcome measurements and RTS criteria were extracted from each article included in the review.

RESULTS:

39 studies met the inclusion criteria and reported their isokinetic strength evaluation protocol following ACLR. The variables that were most commonly used were concentric/concentric mode of contraction (31 studies), angular velocity of 60°/s (29 studies), 3-5 repetitions (24 studies), range of motion of 0-90° (6 studies), and using gravity correction (9 studies). 8 studies reported strength limb symmetry index scores as part of their RTS criteria.

CONCLUSIONS:

There was no standardised isokinetic protocol following ACLR; isokinetic strength measures have not been validated as useful predictors of successful RTS. We propose a standard protocol to allow consistency of testing and accurate comparison of future research.

KEYWORDS:

ACL; Isokinetics; Strength isometric isokinetic

PMID:
26105017
DOI:
10.1136/bjsports-2014-093962
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center