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Fam Pract Res J. 1989 Fall-Winter;9(1):65-72.

The relationship between self-esteem and physical health in a family practice population.

Abstract

This study explored the relationship between self-esteem and physical health in a primary care setting. Sixty-eight adult patients (33 males and 35 females) at a Family Practice Center completed a questionnaire assessing self-esteem and physical health. Multiple regression analysis was used in exploring the effects of self-esteem, and the control variables age, gender, employment and marital status on health status, as assessed from the patient's chart, and on number of symptoms, as assessed through patient self-report. The regression on health status was significant overall (F = 4.12, p less than .001) with each of the predictors yielding significant coefficients. Those with high self-esteem, younger people, men, and employed people had significantly higher health status scores as assessed from the patient's chart. The regression on number of symptoms was marginally significant overall (F = 2.28, p less than .06) with self-esteem emerging as a significant predictor (p less than .05). Those with high self-esteem had significantly fewer symptoms as reported on the Hopkins Symptom Check List. These results support the existence of a positive relationship between self-esteem and physical health in a family practice patient population.

PMID:
2610014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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