Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Angew Chem Int Ed Engl. 2015 Jul 6;54(28):8124-8. doi: 10.1002/anie.201501779. Epub 2015 Jun 11.

The Chemical Basis of Fungal Bioluminescence.

Author information

1
Institute of Biophysics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akademgorodok, Krasnoyarsk 660036 (Russia).
2
Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya 16/10, Moscow 117997 (Russia).
3
Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan).
4
Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University, Ostrovitianov 1, Moscow 117997 (Russia).
5
Institute of Biophysics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akademgorodok, Krasnoyarsk 660036 (Russia). jigitelson@gmail.com.
6
Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya 16/10, Moscow 117997 (Russia). ivyamp@ibch.ru.
7
Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University, Ostrovitianov 1, Moscow 117997 (Russia). ivyamp@ibch.ru.

Abstract

Many species of fungi naturally produce light, a phenomenon known as bioluminescence, however, the fungal substrates used in the chemical reactions that produce light have not been reported. We identified the fungal compound luciferin 3-hydroxyhispidin, which is biosynthesized by oxidation of the precursor hispidin, a known fungal and plant secondary metabolite. The fungal luciferin does not share structural similarity with the other eight known luciferins. Furthermore, it was shown that 3-hydroxyhispidin leads to bioluminescence in extracts from four diverse genera of luminous fungi, thus suggesting a common biochemical mechanism for fungal bioluminescence.

KEYWORDS:

bioluminescence; bioorganic chemistry; biosynthesis; luciferin; natural products

PMID:
26094784
DOI:
10.1002/anie.201501779
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center